Sports Law • Risk Management

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Terrorism and Sport

Terrorism and extremist actions have become more prevalent in recent history, with individuals and groups resorting to radically violent means to convey their messages. Recent cases, such as the Boston marathon bombing, the Madrid bombing, the attack in Istanbul, and the series of explosions set off in Paris are all examples of how these terrorists have attempted to capitalize on the congregation of people watching or participating in a match.

These attacks rarely focus on the sport itself, but merely use the event as a tool for spreading a message. The gain of a terrorist is most likely a religious, political, or ideological ambition, not a sports-related one. Thus, the attacks on sporting events remain unclear and confusing as to why the attack targeted the event, as those that attend these events are largely diverse in the three aforementioned aspects.

Global Warming Risk and its Impact on Sport

Daytona International Speedway, in May 2009, saw a rainfall in the area so massive, the entire track was underwater for days. In less than 100 years, even on a sunny day, NASCAR’s most famous race might be better achieved with boats instead of cars. Due to rising sea levels, melting ice caps, and heating of the climate, global warming could see this racetrack and stadiums of all sports along coastal lines permanently flooded. Is the sporting industry at all responsible for the ongoing effects of global warming?

Global warming, the accelerated heating of the climate caused by the massive release of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (gases which trap and send heat back to earth instead of into space), can dramatically affect sports in the future, but is also affecting how athletes and organizations are performing today.

MLB Protective Netting Extension: To Protect the Fans or to Protect the Facility Owners?

The start of the 2018 season will see all 30 MLB install protective netting to the near ends of each dugout with some teams extending their protective netting even further. In doing so, these clubs are extending the protection to spectators who are dangerously close to the action. Baseball, since the early 1900’s, has been operating under the safety net of the “Baseball Rule,” the assumption of risk that states that injury from objects leaving the field of play and into the stands are an open and obvious risk that is inherent to the game. In purchasing their tickets and attending a game, spectators agree to the Baseball Rule, which might include their suffering injuries from balls, bats, gloves, and even athletes making their way into the stands.

However, baseball today is vastly different from the games played a century ago.

An Overview of Drone Use for Sports Facilities

Drone use at sporting events has made international news in the last month when a drone piloted by a New York City high school science teacher crashed during a women’s singles match at the U.S. Open Tennis Championship. Days later, a drone crashed at the stadium shortly before a Kentucky football game. There were no injuries as a result of those two incidents. However, in a triathlon filmed in Australia, an athlete was injured by a drone within meters of the finish line.

Disaster Planning

In the wake of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, where estimates at this writing are 10,000 people dead and hundreds of thousands of people misplaced, it is time to consider whether your organization is prepared for a significant weather disaster.
1. Disaster Plan Notebook

How to Avoid Making a Racket Over Racquets: Using Equipment Only For Its Intended Use

I’ll bet that on occasion employees of your organization have had to warn a child or adult not to use sports equipment for things other than their intended use. Perhaps you’ve seen someone using a baseball bat to dislodge a basketball from a net; a weight bench to stand on in order to reach something; small weights to prop a door open; or a tennis racquet to kill a bug. Most of the time, using equipment for something other than what it was designed for does not cause any harm.