Sports Law • Risk Management

angela's blog

Wind Toppled Stage Kills Spectators: Preventable Tragedy?

Many sporting venues have outdoor concerts, finish lines or awards presentations for which a temporary elevated stage or platform is constructed. In anticipation of hosting any type of event, an event planner should prepare for a multitude of problems, including those caused by natural disasters. However, a natural disaster during an outdoor concert at the Indiana State Fair on Saturday night leaves some questioning of the venue’s disaster preparedness.

NCAA New Rule Regarding Pole Vault Helmets

Not so long ago a pole vaulter who wished to use protective headgear had few options. Vaulters resorted to wearing equipment, such as skating helmets, that were neither tested nor specifically recommended for use in pole vaulting. However, over the last decade there has been increasing concern and discussion about creating standardized pole vaulting headgear in order to minimize head injuries and to prevent the death of athletes’ who hit their head during a vault. Such widespread concern for pole vaulters’ safety has prompted some significant changes in the last five years.

Five Things to Know About Negligence: Part II

After reading my “Part I” blog on negligence, you may be curious to know more about how your organization could be exposed to and shielded from liability. Below are five additional things about negligence that should be shared with all members of your organization.

Five Things to Know About Negligence: Part I

Negligence should be of concern for all sports organizations. Below are five things about negligence that should be shared with all members of your organization.

Baseball Fan Falls to His Death

It is fairly routine that baseball players will flip balls into the waiting hands of spectators in the stands, but it is unusual that such a routine act would be the catalyst in a tragedy. Texas Rangers center fielder, Josh Hamilton, performed such a routine act by tossing a dead ball towards some fans, but the ball fell short of penetrating the stands. Shannon Stone, a spectator at the game, reached over the railing for the ball, lost his balance and fell head first twenty feet to the ground.

Psychological Abuse in Sport

Last night while walking by some batting cages, I observed a middle-aged man swearing at a young teenage boy and telling him that he was worthless and pathetic. There was no team and there was no game, just a single man humiliating a little boy with his angry words following what must have been perceived as an unsuccessful batting practice. I can only assume the verbal abuse was rained down on the boy by his father in a likely failed effort to motivate the child to improve his athletic performance. However, this negative treatment from father to son, can have serious psychological consequences on the child and might be classified as psychological abuse.