Sports Law • Risk Management

Negligence

Golf Carts Present a Risk to Golf Courses and Tournament Organizers

Golf carts used for practice and in tournaments present a hazard for players and where injuries have been suffered, injured parties have filed lawsuits against golf clubs and other parties. The following are summaries of several appellate court decisions of cases involving the use of golf carts that are helpful to understand the risk of injuries whenever golf carts are utilized.

Wind Toppled Stage Kills Spectators: Preventable Tragedy?

Many sporting venues have outdoor concerts, finish lines or awards presentations for which a temporary elevated stage or platform is constructed. In anticipation of hosting any type of event, an event planner should prepare for a multitude of problems, including those caused by natural disasters. However, a natural disaster during an outdoor concert at the Indiana State Fair on Saturday night leaves some questioning of the venue’s disaster preparedness.

Five Things to Know About Negligence: Part II

After reading my “Part I” blog on negligence, you may be curious to know more about how your organization could be exposed to and shielded from liability. Below are five additional things about negligence that should be shared with all members of your organization.

Five Things to Know About Negligence: Part I

Negligence should be of concern for all sports organizations. Below are five things about negligence that should be shared with all members of your organization.

October 21, 2010: Assumption of Risk: T.J. Lavin's BMX Bike Crash

Following a tragic bike accident in Las Vegas last week, T.J. Lavin, a BMX biker, is still in a doctor-induced coma, according to yesterday’s report from People. On a qualifying run at a Las Vegas event, Lavin was unsuccessful in getting his feet back on his pedals and was knocked unconscious after he landed hard on the ground (ESPN Action Sports, Oct. 18, 2010). The risk associated with sport is what makes an activity exciting and challenging, but risk can be frightening for the host of a competition.

September 27, 2010: Skier Assumed Risk of Injury by Snowboarder

In a recent case, Bell v. Dean, __A.2d __, 2010 WL 3211956 (Pa.Super. August 16, 2010), Plaintiff Bell, a skier, brought a personal injury action against Dean, a snowboarder, claiming that he sustained injuries arising out of a collision at Ski Roundtop, a recreational ski area. The accident occurred while they were both progressing down Ramrod, an “expert level” ski slope. Bell claimed that Dean was snowboarding at a high rate of speed down the steeper “headwall” of the slope and failed to keep a proper lookout, and by doing so was negligent.