Sports Law • Risk Management

Triathlon

An Overview of Drone Use for Sports Facilities

Drone use at sporting events has made international news in the last month when a drone piloted by a New York City high school science teacher crashed during a women’s singles match at the U.S. Open Tennis Championship. Days later, a drone crashed at the stadium shortly before a Kentucky football game. There were no injuries as a result of those two incidents. However, in a triathlon filmed in Australia, an athlete was injured by a drone within meters of the finish line.

Triathlon Risk Management: The USAT Advantage

USA Triathlon, like many national governing bodies of sport provide multi-sports race directors the opportunity to sanction their events for a fee in return for insurance, use of USAT branding, liability waiver form, risk management expertise, inclusion of their race in the athlete ranking system, use of USAT Competitive Rules and enforcement by certified officials, access to educational opportunities and race director certification, and more. What puzzles me is why any race director of a multi-sport race would choose to go it alone without this sanction.

NYC Triathlon and Open Water Swims: A Sport of Extreme Sorts

Today as I was swimming laps, I experienced fluid buildup in my lungs. The fluid made it hard to catch my breath, but my stubbornness made it even more difficult to stop swimming before I was done with my set. Not being able to breathe, however, induced a bit of panic, which increased when I had a flash that the lifeguard, who had early been distracted flirting with a guy on the pool deck, might not be paying enough attention to me should I need rescued. At that moment, I recognized that I was responsible for my well-being and that I should not fully trust that someone else would save me, even if it was that person’s job to do so. With that acknowledgement, I stopped swimming until my throat cleared enough to finish my set. This experience left me contemplating about the recent deaths that occurred during the swim segment of the New York City (NYC) Triathlon and what the athletes may have experienced during the race.

May 1, 2011: Save Money with Pre-Event Research

When thinking about starting a new event in your area, like a running race or a triathlon, you should do a little planning and research before investing any money. First, think about what type of event you would like to host. Choose a particular event in which you have a high level of competency, which will make it easier for you to understand all the details needed to host a particular competition. Though to further improve your chance of success, consider starting with a more logistically simple race, such as coordinating a small running race.

April 7, 2011: Triathlon Risk Management Part III: Running

Race directors generally breathe a sigh of relief when the athletes are out of the water and off the bike. If no one drowned or got in a bike accident, the triathlon will most likely have been considered safe. My message to race directors is to not let down your guard after the bike. Runners have many opportunities to be injured and sometimes, fatally.

November 25, 2010: Beware of Ninja Triathletes

This week’s episode of Hawaii 5-0 was amusing to me with its plot centering on rogue triathletes who skillfully planned a burglary during the “Annual Koko Classic Triathlon”. The ninja triathletes were apparently quite successful with previous crimes as evidenced by the fact that they could afford to rent a multi-million dollar Honolulu house to train in and use as a base camp for their illegal activities. The 60 minute episode was chock full of risk management issues, inspiring this blog.