Sports Law • Risk Management

NCAA

NCAA New Rule Regarding Pole Vault Helmets

Not so long ago a pole vaulter who wished to use protective headgear had few options. Vaulters resorted to wearing equipment, such as skating helmets, that were neither tested nor specifically recommended for use in pole vaulting. However, over the last decade there has been increasing concern and discussion about creating standardized pole vaulting headgear in order to minimize head injuries and to prevent the death of athletes’ who hit their head during a vault. Such widespread concern for pole vaulters’ safety has prompted some significant changes in the last five years.

March 25, 2011: Nader Proposes To Do Away With Athletic Scholarships

If colleges were no longer permitted to offer athletic scholarships, how would the game change? The Seattle Times reported late last night that Ralph Nader is seeking to change the way the game of sports is played at the university level.

October 31, 2010: Halloween Trick? Celebrities and Potential College Recruits Don't Mix

On this Halloween the University of Iowa is not getting a holiday treat, but instead a reminder that celebrities and potential athlete recruits don’t mix. Or at least they shouldn’t mix. Just today the Des Moines Register posted an article about two particular Hollywood celebrities, Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore, whose involvement in the recruiting process may amount to a NCAA violation at the University of Iowa.

September 5, 2010: Football Coaches Keeping Quiet about Head Injuries

University of Hawaii Warriors did well in their football season opener against USC. Although they lost 49 to 36, they certainly held their own. Unfortunately, UH starting quarterback Bryant Moniz suffered a hard hit on the helmet in the third quarter. This seemed very serious to me and I was certainly concerned about whether Moniz would be medically cleared to fly to the East Coast to play their next game against Army. All that I heard on the news was that Moniz sustained a “possible head injury” or an “apparent head injury”. No one was saying that he had a concussion, because to do so might have meant benching Moniz even if it turned out that he did not. Apparently, medical clearance in such instances can take a week or more and this can certainly impact an athlete’s season.