Sports Law • Risk Management

youth

Punishment in Sport: Deadly Consequences?

Should there be punishment in sport? One father of a middle school girl in Indiana apparently does not agree with punishment in sport. The father did not think it was appropriate for his daughter’s basketball coach to make her run laps for arguing with another teammate. According to a Yahoo! Sports article from March 16th, the father was so upset with his daughter’s punishment, the dad administered his own punishment to the coach by socking him in head until he was unconscious. The incident may have turned deadly had another coach not intervened.

Psychological Abuse in Sport

Last night while walking by some batting cages, I observed a middle-aged man swearing at a young teenage boy and telling him that he was worthless and pathetic. There was no team and there was no game, just a single man humiliating a little boy with his angry words following what must have been perceived as an unsuccessful batting practice. I can only assume the verbal abuse was rained down on the boy by his father in a likely failed effort to motivate the child to improve his athletic performance. However, this negative treatment from father to son, can have serious psychological consequences on the child and might be classified as psychological abuse.

September 23, 2010: Concussion Discussion in Congress Ramps Up

While creating guidelines to help coaches and parents identify when it is safe for a concussed minor child to return to sports; there is potential harm to coaches and sport organizations. Two federal House committees are each working on a federal bill to propose legislation to protect youth from the harms of concussions. One bill is intended to gather experts to draft guidelines on how to manage concussions then dangle a carrot of incentive by offering federal grants to states to establish standards. The other bill would mandate public school districts adopt or adhere to certain standards.

August 4, 2010: Cash Collection by Volunteers for Club Sports

Here is a scenario that commonly occurs: You oversee the operations of a non-profit youth club sport. To keep costs down, you use volunteers to process registration applications and to collect game day and tournament fees. This is a brilliant plan to use volunteers because parents gladly give their time to support the team for which their son or daughter plays.