Sports Law • Risk Management

parents

Hockey Dad Accused of Shining Laser at Goalie: The Risks of Lasers in Sport

A hockey Dad allegedly pointed a laser beam into the eyes of the goalie of the opposing hockey team playing his daughter’s high school team in an important game this week. Once his dangerous behavior was observed by the school’s assistant superintendent, she ordered that the man leave the rink. The outcome of the game was not changed even though there was an appeal. The man was charged with disturbing the peace and will have to appear in court to face such charges. On the morning news, I heard that he was or might be charged with assault and battery. This is yet another case in which a parent interferes with his child’s game.

October 29, 2010: 4 Year Old Cyclist a Defendant in Lawsuit

A bizarre lawsuit came to my attention today. An injured elderly woman sued a 4 year old girl, claiming that the little girl was negligent for running her down while riding a bicycle with training wheels. The court actually is allowing the lawsuit to proceed, despite the young age of the defendant. I doubt that this court ruling will result in a rash of lawsuits against little kids. However, it does serve as a warning to parents and youth coaches that supervision of children playing sports is crucial.

September 23, 2010: Concussion Discussion in Congress Ramps Up

While creating guidelines to help coaches and parents identify when it is safe for a concussed minor child to return to sports; there is potential harm to coaches and sport organizations. Two federal House committees are each working on a federal bill to propose legislation to protect youth from the harms of concussions. One bill is intended to gather experts to draft guidelines on how to manage concussions then dangle a carrot of incentive by offering federal grants to states to establish standards. The other bill would mandate public school districts adopt or adhere to certain standards.

August 4, 2010: Cash Collection by Volunteers for Club Sports

Here is a scenario that commonly occurs: You oversee the operations of a non-profit youth club sport. To keep costs down, you use volunteers to process registration applications and to collect game day and tournament fees. This is a brilliant plan to use volunteers because parents gladly give their time to support the team for which their son or daughter plays.